Reciprocity and free hospitality concept couchsurfing

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Reciprocity and free hospitality concept couchsurfing

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Hospitality Networks: The Couchsurfing Concept – The Drawing Board

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So why should one be looking for alternatives to Couchsurfing? InJohn Wilcock set up the Traveler's Directory as a listing of his friends willing to host each other when traveling.
Mailing List The growing popularity of CouchSurfing poses significant ques- of hospitality tions about the way hospitality is performed in an era of digital communications, network hospitality online social networking and alternative travel. The studies in this issue bring fresh technology insights to the sociological and cultural significance of hospitality in a networked reciprocity world by offering detailed accounts of the new possibilities and new problems that risk emerge when complete strangers encounter one another online and accommodate one another offline.
Reciprocity Beyond Borders: The Case of CouchSurfing Network in Hanoi, Vietnam Ancient Greece[ edit ] In Ancient Greecehospitality was a right, with the host being expected to make sure the needs of his guests were met.
Usage Statistics Emerging out of two related transformations in economic production, namely the rise of the information age and the shift toward late capitalism, the network society revolves not around hierarchical structures but around non—linear complexes of social and technological flows such as globalization or the Internet.

The concept of reciprocity in the host-guest relationship has been recognised for centuries, both in the western and oriental cultures.

Scholars in the West have posited that the receiving, hosting and entertaining of guests imply certain reciprocal expectations, albeit the act of hospitality occurs in social, private or commercial domains. Within each hospitality setting, the interaction between hosts and guests is manifested distinctively.

This study specifically looks at how the reciprocal host-guest interaction is exhibited in the private domain of hospitality by examining the case of Couchsurfing. Despite the popularity of the CouchSurfing network and other similar ones, little has been researched on the dynamics of members engaged in this type of travel, and how the meaning of hospitality and reciprocity is demonstrated through the interaction between the hosts and the guests in the non-monetary contexts.

Furthermore, while the concept of reciprocity in relation to hospitality has been studied widely in the West, little has been known about how hosts and guests interact in non-western cultures, including Asian, especially in private setting despite the fact that tourism is a fast growing industry in non-western countries.

Reciprocity and free hospitality concept couchsurfing

The aim of this study is to examine the importance of reciprocity in the non-monetary, private domain of hospitality in a non-western culture. More specifically, taking Hanoi, Vietnam where there is a significant number of active couchsurfers of over members as a qualitative case study, the main objectives of this study to investigate how the concept of reciprocity within the context of CouchSurfing is manifested in Asian culture, particularly in Vietnamese culture; and how the notion of non-monetary exchange is observed and practised by the Vietnamese hosts towards their guests in private setting.

The findings from this research suggest that the concepts of hospitality and reciprocity, while universal, have some features unique to Vietnamese culture and Vietnamese couchsurfing community, especially in terms of moral values, and differences from one generation to another when it comes to hosting strangers.Although the term "couchsurfing" loosely refers simply to staying with hosts while you travel, over 4 million couchsurfers a year turn to caninariojana.com for a safe way to find hosts who offer free .

Hospitality Networks: The Couchsurfing Concept Posted on March 5, May 27, Author Posted By: Peter caninariojana.com (CS) is a social network whose members host each other when travelling, show their visitors around, and organize various meetups and social events.

The findings from this research suggest that the concepts of hospitality and reciprocity, while universal, have some features unique to Vietnamese culture and Vietnamese couchsurfing community, especially in terms of moral values, and differences from one generation to another when it comes to hosting strangers.

Hospitality refers to the relationship between a guest and a host, wherein the host receives the guest with goodwill, including the reception and entertainment of guests, visitors, or strangers.

16 Couchsurfing alternatives in , the best free hospitality exchange websites

Louis, chevalier de Jaucourt describes hospitality in the Encyclopédie as the virtue of a great soul that cares for the whole universe through the . The growing popularity of online hospitality exchange networks like Couchsurfing and Airbnb point toward a new paradigm of sociality for a mobile and networked society as hospitable encounters among friends and strangers become entangled with social media and networking technologies.

Reputation and Reciprocity on caninariojana.com Debra Lauterbach, Hung Truong, Tanuj Shah, Lada Adamic International, Global Freeloaders, Hospitality Club, and CouchSurfing.

caninariojana.com, the community which we study in this paper, is the by far the largest and most popular As for reciprocity, this concept has been studied in many.

Global concept, local practice: Taiwanese experiences of Couchsurfing | De-Jung Chen - caninariojana.com