A literary analysis of music in the song the game of life and the short story the lottery

Using to her advantage conventions of narrative stories such as character development, plot control, and irony, she is able to bring the reader into a world of emotions that society would scoff at. Her father died when she was only four years old, which left her mother and grandmother to raise, and shape her desires and ideologies Charters Having been raised primarily by strong willed feminine role models, Chopin developed a taste for more of an unconventional role for women in society.

A literary analysis of music in the song the game of life and the short story the lottery

A literary analysis of music in the song the game of life and the short story the lottery

Accordingly, we are prohibited from presenting the full text here in our short story collection, but we can present a summary of the story, along with by some study questions, commentary, and explanations.

It is important to have some historical context to understand this story and the negative reaction that it generated when it appeared in the June 26, issue of The New Yorker.

The setting was emblematic of "small town America" and many people identified directly with the setting and the gathering depicted.

It was thought to be good for the businesses and good for the community. These gatherings were usually organized by the city council and featured lotteries with modest cash-prizes to help lure people into their vehicles for the long drive to town. So the scene was instantly recognizable to readers -- especially rural readers -- when the story was published, and they did not like the way that this particular story developed and concluded.

Many interpreted the story as an attack on the values of rural communities and "small town America. Here is a summary of the story, which will be followed by additional commentary.

On a warm summer day, villagers gather in a town square to participate in a lottery. The village is small with about residents, and they are in an excited but anxious mood. We learn that this is an annual event and that some surrounding towns are thinking about abandoning the lottery.

Tess Hutchinson makes an undramatic entrance and chats briefly with Mrs. The night before Mr. Summers, a town leader who officiates the lottery, had made paper slips listing all the families with the help of Mr. Graves subtle name choice? The slips were stored overnight in a safe at the coal company.

The villagers start to gather at 10 a. Children busy themselves collecting stones -- one of those odd details that will later emerge loaded with meaning -- until the proceedings get underway and they are called together by their parents.

Summers works down the list of families, summoning the head man of each household. A male sixteen years or older comes forward and draws a slip of paper. When every family has a slip of paper, Mr. Summers has everyone look at the slip, and we discover that Bill Hutchinson has drawn the one slip with a black spot.

Hutchinson begins to protest. Once a family is chosen, the second round begins. In this round, each family member, no matter how old or young, must draw a slip of paper.

It is Tess Hutchinson who draws the slip with the black circle. Hutchinson protests the unfairness of the situation, each of the villagers picks up a stone -- "And someone gave little Davy Hutchinson a few pebbles" -- and closes in on her.

The story ends with Mrs. Shirley Jackson and the editors at The New Yorker were both surprised by the reaction. Here is an excerpt from Jackson herself: Even my mother scolded me: I suspect that some folks made simpler inferences about the story that they still found offensive; that the stones represented harmful gossip and insults, that these gatherings were a place where unfounded rumors could be born by chance and inflict real damage on those targeted; as gathering by gathering, a new "target" might become subject to slander earned or unearned.

Jackson kept her intended meaning to herself, believing that it would emerge more clearly with the passage of time. But considering that she was genuinely surprised by the reaction, it seems logical to conclude that she intended to make a commentary on general human nature rather than a specific criticism of rural American communities in the midth century.

SparkNotes: The Lottery: Foreshadowing and Suspense

Personally, I think the questions of permission and participation make for a great discussion or essay about this particular short story. As small as the gathering is, it is an official event and an act of governance. So the blame belongs to you as well. That is part of the foundation for many of the ideas he advocates in his essay On Civil Disobedience.A literary analysis of music in the song the game of life and the short story the lottery Posted by on Nov 8, in Copywriting | 0 comments Home» Copywriting» A literary analysis of music in the song the game of life and the short story the lottery.

Second, the social classes of this society help display the Marxism with in the short story, “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson. Jackson sets up a series of social classes.

A song is full of literary devices and figurative language, and the music develops tone and mood. When writing an essay about a song, you can't pay attention to the lyrics alone. The way the melody accompanies the lyrics can intensify or even change their emotional meaning, because music is a language on its own.

The internal and external conflicts of the short story supported the theme by making problems from discontentment. Situational Irony made the story have a plot twist which affected the theme. The Lottery by Shirley Jackson.

A literary analysis of music in the song the game of life and the short story the lottery

Shirley Jackson's short story The Lottery was published in and it is not in the public domain.. Accordingly, we are prohibited from presenting the full text here in our short story collection, but we can present a summary of the story, along with by some study questions, commentary, and explanations.

List of Short Stories for Teaching Irony Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” – Join one of literature’s most unlikeable characters as she ruins her life in a most ironic way.

Kate Chopin’s “Story of an Hour” – First her husband’s dead, which makes her sad but happy.

Short Stories for Teaching Irony with Lesson Ideas | ELA Common Core Lesson Plans